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Reusing code

Two Tools Required for a Freelance Developer to Accomplish Anything

Is it possible to work on multiple projects at once? Yes, it is, but you need these tools to accomplish it.

Recently, I received an email from someone asking how I could work on seven projects at once.

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Tag: Developers

Two Tools Required for a Freelance Developer to Accomplish Anything

Is it possible to work on multiple projects at once? Yes, it is, but you need these tools to accomplish it.

June 13th, 2011 at 7:00am — Comments: (2) — By: Jonathan Danylko — Tags: Developers

Reusing code

Recently, I received an email from someone asking how I could work on seven projects at once.

Like I wrote before in a previous post, it wasn't easy, but I was able to accomplish it (and I was definitely tired because of it).

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GoDaddy Tips and Tricks for ASP.NET MVC Web Sites

This miniature troubleshooting guide will help developers who upload ASP.NET MVC web sites to GoDaddy.

February 1st, 2011 at 6:00am — Comments: (4) — By: Jonathan Danylko — Tags: Developers

Server Room

When you first start using GoDaddy with WebForms, everything seems simple...you write your site, you upload your changes, attach your connection strings, and immediately test the site. Sometimes things don't go as smooth as you want them to when working with external web hosting companies.

Recently, I've been working on another personal web site and using ASP.NET MVC 2 with Entity Framework 4. Along with finishing up the coding, I've uploaded a "Coming Soon" page to let my users know that I'm almost done with it (and just to get some subscribers signing up).

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10 ways to show you're a programming rockstar

How many programmers do you know who are rock stars? What characteristics do they have?

January 25th, 2011 at 8:00am — Comments: (36) — By: Jonathan Danylko — Tags: Developers

One ball in a group of squares

It seems nowadays that programmers are a dime a dozen, but how do you pick the best programmers from the rest of the crowd.

It's not just about coding (although that is a big factor). It's about building your skill set over the years and nurturing them so you can stand out from the programming "collective."

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5 best practices for building ASP.NET MVC web sites

Since ASP.NET MVC 2.0 is included with Visual Studio 2010, here is a list of "lessons learned" from building three systems from scratch using ASP.NET MVC.

April 29th, 2010 at 5:00am — Comments: (0) — By: Jonathan Danylko — Tags: Developers

Midnight Coder

Since developing with ASP.NET MVC pre-1.0, I've been building a hefty library of ASP.NET MVC 1 & 2 routines that includes everything from blogging to forum modules to CRM libraries.

Visual Studio 2010 shipped with ASP.NET MVC 2.0. If you are a new developer to ASP.NET MVC, it may be daunting at first, but definitely dig in and give it a try. I would recommend it over WebForms development any day (ViewState? Buh-Bye).

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Mail Bag: What programming languages should I learn?

After answering a fellow reader, I thought an appropriate post would be great for other readers as well.

March 17th, 2010 at 6:00am — Comments: (0) — By: Jonathan Danylko — Tags: Developers

Q: I started C a few days ago, and I think I'm doing well with it as a first programming language. Is it recommended to learn many programming languages? And what should I know in order to learn programming better?

A: When I first started programming, there wasn't an abundant amount of programming languages for me to pick from. I didn't know any better and wasn't exposed to anything but BASIC, QBASIC, and Apple Basic.

Quite a selection, huh?

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Version Control Commandments

Version Control is a staple in a developers day-to-day routine. Follow these guidelines for proper versioning.

March 2nd, 2010 at 7:00am — Comments: (0) — By: Jonathan Danylko — Tags: Developers

Version Control Library

Using version control is vital to a development shop. Even though I am one developer, I have a subversion code server in my basement that I constantly use. If I write a bad piece of code, it feels so good to rollback to a previous version of code instead of trying to wrack my brain figuring out what code to back out.

In a team or corporate environment, though, you may have some developers who are new to the team and are unfamiliar with version control software like CVS or Subversion. I know those coming from Microsoft SourceSafe to CVS had some troubles adjusting.

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Revisit: What Books Are Within Your Reach?

What titles are close to you for reference purposes? Here's my list.

February 23rd, 2010 at 6:00am — Comments: (0) — By: Jonathan Danylko — Tags: Developers

A library of developer books

How many of your books have changed since my last post? I'm sure that since 2007 your library of reference books should've changed a little.

A while back, I wrote a post about what books are in your library that are within reach while you develop. I figured now would be a good time to update my post.

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How to automatically update your social network status through .NET APIs

If you wrote your own CMS and want to update social networks automatically, here are some suggestions.

February 2nd, 2010 at 6:00am — Comments: (1) — By: Jonathan Danylko — Tags: Developers

Business Network

For developers who are creating plug-ins to content management systems (or their own, wink wink), there is no reason why you can't automate your social status updates to let your audience know what's happening with you on your social network of choice.

Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter are my "home base" of social networks where I hang out at.

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How deep do you take your coding into a company?

Every developer has personal code they use everyday, but what happens when you are hired?

January 27th, 2010 at 6:00am — Comments: (0) — By: Jonathan Danylko — Tags: Developers

Sticking out from the crowd

How much of your "brains" do you take into a company? This post explains how to determine what code you can and cannot take into a company if you already wrote it prior to being hired.

But first, let's get this out of the way.

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The Band-Aid Mentality of Fixing Bugs

When debugging applications, do you code it properly or do you procrastinate or rush through it just to get it done?

January 21st, 2010 at 10:00am — Comments: (2) — By: Jonathan Danylko — Tags: Developers

Band-aid Programming

Developers know when they see a bad piece of code and that comes from experience. As you progress through your career, you'll see some...uhhh...ummm...interesting code. Most developers have egos and need to check them at the door if you want a quality software product.

What's a piece of "band-aid" code?

Band-aids are described when a coder decides to fix a defect quickly as opposed to fixing the defect correctly. The mentality is that they want it off their plate by fixing the problem as fast a possible, which leaves the defect as a quick fix and not a long term solution.

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